[MUD-Dev] CHI 2002: Funology: Designing Enjoyment

Bruce Mitchener bruce at puremagic.com
Fri Dec 21 19:15:03 New Zealand Daylight Time 2001


When Claw/ added the --<cut>-- markers, he mis-placed them slightly,
so, this version is correct:

 From http://www-users.york.ac.uk/~djr14/CHI02_funology:

--<cut>--
     It is now generally accepted in the HCI community that
     usability considerations should be central to product
     design. Over the past thirty years the concept of usability has
     evolved from a narrow product orientated attribute, to
     encompass broader concerns with the experience of use. However
     broad the latest definition is, it recently acquired a new
     associate: the joy of use or perhaps
     "enjoyability". Traditionally, HCI is about work and work
     systems, however, the proliferation of computer entertainment
     technologies make fun and enjoyment important software
     requirements. The distinctions between "work" and leisure" and
     "tool" and "toy" are being challenged by new approaches to
     design. Managers are urged to "understand that there are
     positive consequences of using microcomputers for fun" at the
     workplace (Igbaria et al 1994:p. 358). Carroll and Thomas
     (1998) propose game-like, metaphoric cover stories for standard
     process control jobs as a possible means of addressing boredom
     and vigilance problems inherent in routine tasks. Although
     there is growing interest in computers and fun, we are still
     far from achieving a coherent approach. There are at least
     three perspectives on computers and fun in current HCI
     literature; they can be thought of as: "usability reductionism"
     which supposes that enjoyment simply results from ease of use;
     "design reductionism" which sees enjoyment and fun as features
     to be added on by graphical and industrial designers; and
     "marketing reductionism" which simply uses the concept as an
     advertising tool.  None of these perspectives are
     satisfactory. As more researchers get involved in this topic it
     has become clear that our current understanding of user
     concerns, derived from the world of work, is simply not
     adequate to this new design challenge. Theoretical perspectives
     drawn from a wide variety of disciplines such as Psychology,
     Sociology and Design are necessary to formulate an
     approach. Fun is set to be a major issue as information and
     communication technology moves out of the office and into the
     living room. In this workshop we hope to attract researchers
     and theorists, as well as designers and other "funologists" to
     discuss their work and to further develop the field.

     Current topics in this area include: theories of fun; measuring
     fun; electronic communication and fun; making work fun and fun
     for specialist groups such as younger or older people.
--<end>--

Given their comment:

     Carroll and Thomas (1998) propose game-like, metaphoric cover
     stories for standard process control jobs as a possible means
     of addressing boredom and vigilance problems inherent in
     routine tasks.

It'd be interesting to see if they come up with some better
solutions than the downtime imposed in some current games. :)

Their Call For Participation:

--<cut>--
     Call for participation

     Fun is set to be a major issue as information and communication
     technology moves out of the office and into the living room. As
     more researchers get involved in this topic it has become clear
     that our current understanding of user concerns, derived from
     the world of work, is simply not adequate to this new design
     challenge.

     This workshop aims to:

         * provide a forum to discuss emerging issues in the
           design of enjoyable applications;
         * discuss a research agenda;
         * identify recommendations about how companies and
           research funders can combine and use the several
           disciplinary specialities needed to design fun
           products.

     We encourage participation from a wide range of disciplines
     including Computer Science, Design, Psychology and Social
     Science and other funologists.

     We plan to cover the following general topics: theory, drawn
     from various fields; justification, in terms of field studies
     and experiments; practice, through case studies of software
     products; technique, the design process and critique and
     reasons for staying with the current usability concept.

     The workshop format will include a presentation by each
     participant, discussion and games. In addition each participant
     will lead a discussion of the issues raised by another
     participant's paper.

     The workshop will be limited to 16 participants. Please submit
     a one- or two-page position paper outlining your interest in
     this topic to A.Monk at psych.york.ac.uk.  Position papers must be
     received by 25 January 2002.  Participants will be notified of
     selection by 22 February 2002.
--<end>--

Might be interesting anyway.

  - Bruce

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